Explorations in Xenophilia: “Goblins”

Note: This is the fourth in a series of excerpts from Doctor Meredith Underwood’s influential book on the erotic lives of xenosapient people, Explorations in Xenophilia.

“Goblins are also completely hairless and have very smooth, oily skin. Merkressa’s body was an absolute pleasure to touch, and she reported that she found mine rough and abrasive because of the unfamiliar hair follicles. She was fascinated by hair, especially by pubic hair, which struck her as hilarious. She thought of body hair as a kind of very diffuse clothing, and found it visually erotic in the same way as we might consider sheer stockings or a see-through blouse to be erotic…”

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Explorations in Xenophilia: “Dwarfs”

Note: This is the third in a series of excerpts from Doctor Meredith Underwood’s influential book on the erotic lives of xenosapient people, Explorations in Xenophilia.

“Our first sexual encounters were exciting, but somewhat awkward.  There is a widespread belief among Dwarfs that Humans are soft and fragile creatures, and so Hingli hardly dared touch me, for fear of hurting me.  She only gradually overcame this reticence.  The belief is not entirely without basis, as Dwarfs are much tougher and sturdier than Humans.  This is because Dwarf flesh is significantly denser than Human flesh.  At 120 kilos, Hingli is by no means overweight for a Dwarf, and is extremely physically fit.  Her body is firm and muscular, like that of an athlete….”

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Explorations in Xenophilia: “Introduction”

Note: This is the second in a series of excerpts from Doctor Meredith Underwood’s influential book on the erotic lives of xenosapient people, Explorations in Xenophilia.

“This book concerns the erotic cultures of xenosapient peoples from all over the world. The term “xenosapient” was coined by the great explorer Dr. Perry Plumbgarden, in his classic work Other Sentient Societies, to refer collectively to all those races of beings with whom we share a higher level of sentience.

I cannot overstate the importance of Plumbgarden’s work to Anthropology and Exploration Studies. He was the first scholar to suggest that there might be a robust distinction between xenosapient peoples and mere animals. Before Plumbgarden, my area of research would have been considered a branch of zoology, but today it is widely recognized as a branch of anthropology…”

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Explorations in Xenophilia: “Preface to the First Edition”

Note: This is the first in a series of excerpts from Doctor Meredith Underwood’s influential book on the erotic lives of xenosapient people, Explorations in Xenophilia.

“When I first proposed this book to the Department of Anthropology and Exploration at Badchester College, it was met with vigorous opposition. Although I had only submitted the proposal to a few key readers in my department, copies proliferated and spread throughout the university like wildfire. Within a week it was the talk of campus, my department was being referred to as AnthSex (instead of the more commonly accepted abbreviation, AnthEx), and I had been called everything from dangerously hedonistic (at best) to irredeemably evil (at worst). There were calls to discipline me, to strip me of my tenure or relieve me of my position altogether. There were even those among the more radically conservative colleges calling for my arrest and imprisonment. Even the most generous critiques of my proposal agreed that the research was—potentially, at least—prejudiced and self-indulgent, and that it would necessarily eroticize and exoticize its subjects. There was near-universal agreement that the project would ruin my academic career and expose me, my department, and the university as a whole to ridicule…”

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I Modi No 19: “Pandora”

Note: This is the nineteenth in a series of short stories inspired by Agostino Carracci’s edition of I Modi.

“I opened my box and unleashed all the evils of the world. Only hope remained. So goes the most popular version of my story, but there are other ways the tale can be told. Some say the box contained blessings. I say it all depends on your interpretation…”

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I Modi No 18: “Alcibiade & Glycere”

Note: This is the eighteenth in a series of short stories inspired by Agostino Carracci’s edition of I Modi.

“Do not feel guilty.

Socrates is my one and only lover. I am not being unfaithful to him. Even as you spread your legs for me, even as I feel your lips parting before the smooth curve of my erection, I am not being unfaithful. Socrates himself taught me this…”

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I Modi No 15: “Achilles & Briseis”

Note: This is the fourteenth in a series of short stories inspired by Agostino Carracci’s edition of I Modi.

You are a mystery to me, Achilles.  You are a challenge.

I’ve met men with all sorts of fetishes.  I have discovered ways to satisfy the strangest desires.

I once had a lover who went wild when I stroked his armpits.  What for most people is merely ticklish, was for him the heights of ecstasy.  At first I found it strange and disagreeable to play with them, but nothing arouses like the arousal of another, and I soon grew to love licking those warm, hairy hollows…”

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I Modi No 14: “Messalina in the Booth of Lysisca”

Note: This is the fourteenth in a series of short stories inspired by Agostino Carracci’s edition of I Modi.

“There is no greater aphrodisiac than power, and I am the most powerful woman in the world.  How, then, I ask you, could any one man satisfy me?  My husband Claudius is sweet, but he is old and feeble.  He is nothing but an amuse bouche upon my palette.  On those all-too-rare occasions when he deigns to sleep with me he merely whets my appetite; he does nothing to slake it.  And so I go at night into one of Rome’s most disreputable neighbourhoods, and knock at the door of a certain house of ill repute…”

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